Poetry Forms

I have been ask if I would reblog my post on different types of poetry and syllable counts, etc

Dectina Refrain Poetry Form – Hot Summer Days 

Long

very

hot summer

days have arrived.

Light clouds in the sky

no relief from the heat

clouds disappear, in the air.

Grass browning as the sun-rays burns,

the wildflowers still holding their heads high.

“Long very hot summer days have arrived”.

Dectina Refrain looks exactly like an Etheree, but with one distinguishing characteristic. This form was created by Marion Friedenthal and named by Luke Prater.

  • Like the Etheree, it is a decastitch (10-line stanza) with an emphasis on the syllabic count of each line.
  • Also, like the Etheree, the syllabic count ascends: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10
  • Like the Etheree, it is unrhymed.
  • Line 10 is the distinguishing feature between the Etheree and the Dectina Refrain. In the latter form, line 10 is comprised of lines 1-4 altogether and sometimes enclosed in quotation marks. Hence, the refrain.

Tanka Poem – Dreaming Color

forest to the left

northern lights shines in the sky

colors reflexions

like a viral dream drifting

through space upon a spiral

Tanka Poetry consists of five units, usually with the following pattern of  –  5-7-5-7-7 which is syllables.

The first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase.  The final two lines should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Bussokusekika Poetry – a pattern of 5-7-5-7-7-7

A tanka poem with an extra phrase of seven added on at the end.

Haiku (also called nature or seasonal haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. There is many  other versions to write haiku, than the 5/7/5 version.

Haiku – Senryu (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Double Tetractys 

• A decastitch (10-line stanza) with an emphasis on the syllabic count of each line.

  • Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-10-10-4-3-2-1
  • It should express a complete thought and may be on any theme and express any mood.
  • Rhyme is optional.

Etheree Poetry – is a decastitch (10-line stanza) with an emphasis on the syllabic count of each line.

  • Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10
  • It is unrhymed.

Reverse Etheree Poetry– 

Like the Etheree, it is a decastitch (10-line stanza) with an emphasis on the syllabic count of each line.

  • The only difference is that the syllabic count is reversed: 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1
  • It is unrhymed.

Shadorma Poetry is a Spanish poetic form.

A poem of six lines 3-5-3-3-7-5 syllables no set rhyme scheme.

It can have many stanzas, as long as each follows the meter. 

Sidlak Poetry – is a structured poetry consisting of five lines with 3-5-7-9 syllables and a color. The last line must be a color that describes the whole poem or the feeling of the writer, no syllable count.

Retourne is a French form of poetry.  Retourne is in tetrameter, sixteen lines, eight syllables per line, does not require a specific rhyme scheme.

Stanza 2 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 line 2 

Stanza 3 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 line 3 

Stanza 4 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 Line 4

How to Write a Pantoum Poem.  http://shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/pantoum.html

https://www.howmanysyllables.com/

Hope this is helpful.

Poetry is beautiful, a release from stressful days, sit down and try one, a way  to relax. Peace will come within.

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